Auditory Cognitive Neuroscience Experience Lab

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The ACNE Lab addresses issues relating to the processing of complex acoustic signals such as speech, music, and other environmental sounds. Current projects include examining how people learn the sounds of a 2nd language and how one’s native language can interfere with this learning; investigating the ability of listeners to “tune” their perception to the particular characteristics of a speaker (e.g., understanding someone with a foreign accent or disordered speech); and studying how the design of cochlear implants and hearing aids can affect the ability of listeners to understand speech in complex listening environments. This multidisciplinary lab works closely with researchers in Psychology, Linguistics, Neurophysiology, and Electrical Engineering.

 

Announcements

  • The annual meeting of the Auditory Cognitive Neuroscience Society (ACNS) for 2015 will be January 5th-7th. Please visit our ACNS page here for more info!
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  • Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowships in Auditory Cognitive Neuroscience (2014-2015):
    Applications are sought for graduate and postdoctoral fellowships offered by the Auditory Cognitive Neuroscience (ACN) Training Network, which provides stipends to graduate students and postdocs to pursue ACN research with one of 30 faculty members at McGill University, McMaster University, University of Montreal, the Rotman Research Institute, and the Montreal Neurological Institute. Citizens of all countries are eligible. Positions begin September, 2014. The deadline for Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowship applications, funded by NSERC-Create (Canada), is February 7, 2014. Full application details are available at www.acn-create.org/admissions/.
     
  • Drs. Davi Vitela, Andrew Lotto, and Natasha Warner (from the UA Linguistics Dept.) recently published an article in Frontiers in Psychology. Click here to read the article entitled: Perceptual compensation for differences in speaking style.
     
  • In collaboration with Dr. Andrew Lotto, Dr. Lori Holt of Carnegie Melon University has helped develop a specially designed video game to help listeners learn to distinguish important differences between language sounds that do not exist in their native language. The learning that takes place during this simple game is similar to what has been demonstrated after 45 hours of intensive language training. Check out the details on the NSF web site .
     
  • A recently published article by Dr. Andrew Lotto and Kalim Gonzalez on how bilingual speakers switch between languages was featured in the University of Arizona news as well as Science Daily! Click here to read the UofA news article
     
  • Applications are sought for graduate and postdoctoral fellowships offered by the Auditory Cognitive Neuroscience (ACN) Training Network, which provides 1-2 years of stipends to graduate students and postdocs to pursue ACN research with one of 30 faculty members at McGill University, McMaster University, University of Montreal, the Rotman Research Institute, and the Montreal Neurological Institute. Citizens of all countries are eligible. Positions begin September, 2013. The deadline for Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowship applications, funded by NSERC-Create (Canada), is January 18, 2013. Full application details are available at www.acn-create.org/admissions
     
  • Read about how much spectrum is necessary to identify familiar songs: Click here to read the article.
     
  • Brian Monson's research was highlighted in the Discovery News article "Cell Phones: Why You Can't Hear Me Now." Click here to read the article.
     
  • Kathy Carbonell and Davi Vitela were each awarded student transportation subsidies in connection with their attendance at the 162nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in San Diego, CA in November 2011.
     
  • Kathy Carbonell was selected to receive the Speech Language and Hearing Science (SLHS) Department's travel grant award of $300.
     
  • The American Speech-Language-and-Hearing Association (ASHA) selected Antonia “Davi” Vitela to attend the 2011 Lessons for Success Research Conference: Developing the Emerging Scientist. The conference will be held at the ASHA National Office in Rockville, Maryland in April. A conference fellowship-travel award was made available through the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), ASHA’s Research and Science division, and from funds provided by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation (ASHF).
     
  • PhD students Kathy Carbonell and Antonia “Davi” Vitela were notified that they have received the Speech Language and Hearing Science (SLHS) D Department’s travel grant award. Each award is worth $200.